Sous Vide Pineapples


Sous Vide Pineapple

1 Pineapple
150g Caster Sugar
5ml Vanilla Extract
50g Water
50g Cane Sugar
50g Gerwuztraminer
1 Star Anise
1 Cinnamon Stick


1. Bring water, cane sugar, and Gerwuztraminer to a boil
2. Add star anise and cinnamon stick to infuse. Set aside
3. Caramelize Sugar, add pineapple
4. Add sugar/ wine mixture, then add vanilla extract
5. Vacuum seal on High
6. Cook @ 75ºC for 1 hour

78 Degrees Presents: Childhood Memory Dinner (August 20, 2012)

Menu for the night
Menus and place mats at the table with crayons to doodle on
Baby Food
Chilled corn bavarois in baby food jars
Afternoon Snack
House made fish crackers
From left to right: zesty cheddar, creamy ranch, buttery jalapeno
 Alphabet lobster soup
Butter poached lobster, lobster tomato cream, lobster consomme gelee in the form of letter blocks.
Three little pigs
Glazed 40-hour pork belly, sous vide pork tenderloin, parma proscuitto, cherry jus
Pickled mustards, pickled onions, kirsch’d cherries, white balsamic vinegar, parsley oil
Tarragon and parsley leaves, fried pork rind
Freezies
Passionfruit
Campfire (Part I)
Roasted sweet potatoes, marshmallow topping, milk chocolate ganache, feuilletine
Campfire (Part II)
Milk chocolate pudding, shortbread crumbs, marshmallow ice cream
“Kinder surprise”
Dark and milk chocolate, white chocolate, ???

Sous Vide Kobe Beef

With the addition of a vacmaster and a sous vide supreme, I have decided to finally try sous vide-in’ meats. 
I picked up a piece of Kobe striploin from western Canada (not a true Kobe, the cattle is raised in a similar fashion as their Japanese cousins). Before we begin, there is something you need to know about sous vide-in’. There are two trains of thought when it comes to cooking proteins this way: cook and direct serve or cook and chill. When you cook and direct serve, you simply cook the meat to the precise internal temperature of doneness under low temperatures then it is to be served right away, whereas the meat in the latter method is chilled and re-thermalized during service after it has been cooked.
A searing pan is heated for 5-10 minutes on high heat. The striploin is seasoned then seared on all sides with fat. The searing of the meat will kill any bacteria on the surface of the meat; the browning will contribute to the flavour due to the Maillard reaction.

 
The seared meat is placed in a bag with a knob of butter and then vacuum sealed on low. 
The steak is cooked at 60 degrees Celsius for 15 minutes. 

On the left, we have a piece of the same striploin, grilled to the barbie to med rare. 
On the right, the striploin that was sous vided. The striploin was removed from the bag, it was then grilled to give it a better crust and some smokiness.
The blind taste test proved that the sous vided striploin offered a softer and less stringy texture than the other striploin that was cooking on the grill.

Yours Truly on Ossington

On the left: Spinach leaves, buttermilk, crumbs. 
On the right: Salmon tartar, pumpkin seed, shiso leave
Salted cod, rice, tofu pocket (Inari), nori, kewpie (Japanese Mayonese)
On the left: Toasted baguette, pork rillettes
On the right: Thuet bread, whipped duck fat, crispy shallots
Let the tasting menu begin. 

1st course: Pumpkin and yogurt, smoked eggplant puree, buckwheat crumbs, quinoa, cilantro sprouts, nasturtium leaves
2nd course: Pan seared trout, compressed romaine, marinated beet, red nori powder, gribiche sauce

3rd course: Pan seared duck breast, onion pancake, pickled shaved vegetables, white soy 
Last course: Almond panna cotta, meringue, milk foam, sichuan pepper, lychee

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